• Making Fresh Pasta

    When I studied Italian as an undergrad many years ago, the Italian lecturer told us that she makes fresh pasta daily in her house and that we all should try it as it’s just not the same as store-bought pasta. I remember thinking to myself, I can barely make perfectly round and soft rotis, why on earth would I even consider making my own pasta. More than a decade later on one rainy night in the tents of Mina (during my Hajj pilgrimage), a lovely Zambian lady who owned a restaurant back home, convinced the rest of us ladies (yes, we really should have been praying but somehow the topic…

  • My Top 7 Essential Baby (Travel) Products

    Becoming a mum again after eight years meant that a lot had changed in the baby product industry. There are definitely more stylish and even more practical products on the market, supposedly making life simpler for parents. It’s easy to get carried away and buy every “must-have” product but it’s not feasible. These are my top 7 essential baby products. Not only did it make my daily life at home easier, but they all proved to be invaluable when we travelled locally and internationally.   Doona Infant Car Seat/Stroller This has to be by far the best investment I’ve made. The idea is so simple – a car seat converts…

  • Ramadaan Reads for Older Kids

    As a child, I remember the excitement of borrowing a book from the library that had a Muslim/Indian character in it. It felt awesome to be able to identify with the character but unfortunately those books were very few in number. Fast forward to a generation later and the amount of diverse books that’s available on the market is amazing! With Ramadaan literally around the corner, and excited mothers sharing their Ramadaan reads for their little ones, its easy to forget about the older ones. Here are some suggestions from my 9-year-old’s bookshelf. Depending on your child’s reading ability, I would think the following would be suitable for kids aged…

  • Book Review: Weaning Sense by Meg Faure & Kath Megaw

    I first heard the authors of Weaning Sense (Quivertree Publications, 2017) speak when I attended the Clicks Baby Meet Up at Moses Mabhida Stadium late last year, a week before I gave birth to my second child. Meg Faure is an occupational therapist and author of Baby Sense and Sleep Sense (among other titles), and Kath Megaw is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in paediatrics, and the founder of Nutripaeds. Their talk about COLLAB weaning – a scientific-based approach that takes the baby’s age, temperament and personality into consideration – won me over and I purchased a copy of the book at the event. Now that Ibraheem is…

  • Less is More: Why Babies Need Quiet Time

    Ayesha, a first-time mum, usually has a few different activities planned for eight-month-old Hamza each day. After breakfast, they sit with either wooden blocks or plastic shapes, and then she reads to him baby books. After his nap, Ayesha takes out more toys for him while an educational DVD is playing in the background. “Initially, I didn’t want my son to miss out on every opportunity to learn new things. I know how babies can absorb information so I thought while I am at home with him, I will teach him as much as I can. Hamza loves the attention that I give him but I’ve learnt that sometimes he…

  • Majestic Mosques & Divine Desserts: A Week in Istanbul

    It was when I was sitting on the first floor of the charming Hafiz Mustafa café, located at a busy crossroad in the Sirkeci district, that overlooks the bustling narrow street below with its constant chime of the trams, roar of the busses, impatient hoots of the taxis and cars, jingle of the bicycles, and the steady stream of pedestrians, that I realised I am in love with the city of Istanbul. From our view on the first floor, which extended down the hill, allowing us a glimpse of the Golden Horn, we sampled a local dessert called kunefe (made with phyllo pastry, stringy cheese, syrup, and pistachios, and served…

  • Smorgasbord of Sweets and Savouries: Ramadaan in South Africa

    As a child, I knew that Ramadaan was approaching when we received a large package of kajoor (dates) with “Compliments from the Vawda family” neatly printed on the attached label. For each year the Vawdas supplied the neighbourhood Muslims with their dates. When I think of Ramadaan, I think of a renewed sense of faith, spirituality and hope. Then I think of the food. For fasting, on the most basic level, is about abstaining from food. Yet as wives and mothers we are constantly challenged by our families to provide the tastiest of meals, especially during Ramadaan. Ironic as it may be, here in South Africa, the majority of Muslim…